Good news, driving lessons resume

Driving lessons resume in just six weeks, fingers crossed!

It looks like it’s good news from here on out.

Boris is opening the gates to freedom once again. But we’ve got to promise to be good, and in return he’ll wave more restrictions off every month until they’re all gone, and we’re tipsy in the streets on hugs and social contact.

Everybody’s waiting for something to be allowed. Schools, Pubs, Weddings. Whatever’s going to make the biggest difference to them.

Much as I can’t wait, it looks like the 12th April before our turn arrives to resume driving lessons again.

I’m fed up with not leaving home.

There’s a constant stream of delivery drivers, all from Amazon I guess, and my dog barks alerting me to every van pulling up, and not stopping barking until he’s seen them off.

There’s a list of DIY jobs to do (and I really dislike DIY), and a kitchen full of delicious snacks just a few steps away.

But I keep reminding myself, it’s only six weeks and we can get back to some sort of normality, the same normality we left a few weeks back requiring facemasks in car, but that’s better than no lessons at all.

I know it’s going to be a major headache ahead planning lessons again.

When we had to stop lessons for lock down, our instructors were booked solid, and during lock down we’ve built a huge list of people who we’ve promised to contact as soon as we return.

But our first job is to find out who of our original customers will be returning before we can book new customers in.

And, we will have to prioritise time for people who had driving tests booked before lockdown, which will still go ahead.

That said, we know people are desperate to book driving lessons, some have waited almost a year.

So, with lighter days ahead, we will be working extra hours to catch up and squeeze as many people in as we can.

If you want a call back as soon as we start, please email your details to: support@elite-driving-school.co.uk

with the following information and we’ll be in touch:

Your name

Address

Post code

Contact number

email address

So, I can’t wait to get back to taking driving lessons. But I guess everyone’s different, and most people haven’t got a dizzy Labrador at home, wanting to play with every nice DPD delivery driver who walks down the drive.

Just six weeks and counting.

Kev Goldthorpe

01482 772303 / elite-driving-school.co.uk

Best driving practice-Mirror Signal Manoeuvre

Mirror Signal Manoeuvre is a system to develop best driving practice.

But, it can be a lot to learn for new drivers, especially when it’s broken down into it’s core parts of Mirror, Signal, Manoeuvre, where the manoeuvre element consists of Position-Speed-Look, followed by Assess-Decide and Act, MSPSLADA.

Phew, no wonder most learners feel bamboozled when they first start to learn this sequence.

MSM is a drivers systemised approach to every change needed to be made while driving.

Without correct use of the MSM system, a driver can unknowingly leave a trail of carnage behind them.

In the year ending 2018, there were 26,610 killed or seriously injured casualties in road traffic accidents reported to the police. Source department of transport.

A vehicle in the wrong hands is a deadly instrument. The destruction and devastation that accidents cause has taken the many lives of children and adults, and has decimated many families.

People don’t go out to cause accidents, they happen because of a lack of concentration, planning or awareness.

I sure that every time you or a family member go out on a drive, you never think that you might not return home, after all if that were the case many of us wouldn’t go out at all.

But, most of these accidents could be avoided with just one simple system.

You’ve heard it mentioned so many times, Mirror Signal Manoeuvre, but in simple terms it means Look Before You Do, and Let Others Know What You Intend to Do!

So, how can this simple system called Mirror Signal Manoeuvre save lives?  

Okay let’s look at an example. Let’s say you are travelling on a straight road, with no other vehicles, pedestrians or hazards, and you are travelling at 30mph.

In this situation there would be little requirement to use MSM, because there’s no one around and you don’t intent to change speed or direction.

But if there was a cyclist ahead of you, and vehicles following behind you then things would be different.

So, lets imagine you first you see the cyclist, next you look behind and see the following cars, you signal to tell them that you intend to move out to pass the cyclist, and then if it’s safe to do so you complete the manoeuvre and pass the cyclist.

That’s how MSM works.

So, what do you think could happen if you didn’t use MSM routine and just moved out to pass the cyclist?

Remember we are on a long straight road with following traffic. The driver behind you is travelling faster than you and can see there’s no oncoming vehicles, so decides to overtake you.

He can’t see is the cyclist ahead of you because you are blocking his view.

So, now he’s made a decision to overtake you at the same time you have decided to move out and pass the cyclist, what happens next?

Scenario 1: You move across to the right not realising that you are being overtaken, forcing the driver of the passing vehicle to swerve to avoid you, in doing so the driver panics and loses control of the car, and his vehicle collides into a tree on the right of the carriageway.

What could be the result for the driver of the passing vehicle?

Scenario 2: You move out to pass the cyclist slamming into the side of the passing vehicle, you lose control and swerve and collide into the cyclist.

What could be the result for the cyclist?

Scenario 3: You move out to pass the cyclist, the driver who is passing you sounds his horn, you realise last minute that you are being overtaken but by then its too late and you still hit the cyclist.

Again, what could be the result for the cyclist?

But the mirror and signal are just part of the MSM routine, so looking at the previous example of passing a cyclist, here’s how to implement the manoeuvre part of the sequence.

Manoeuvre is broken down to position, speed and look, so you have seen the cyclist checked the mirrors both centre and right door and see the vehicle passing you.

Manoeuvre: So, you slow down and signal right as the passing vehicle comes alongside you. Signalling here isn’t going to be seen by the passing driver, but it warns others behind that you want to move right.

As soon as the passing vehicle is clear, and the following traffic have seen and obeyed your signal, you can then move out to the right giving plenty of clearance to the cyclist. You might consider increasing your speed to get by the cyclist briskly, especially because you’ve slowed while the overtaking vehicle passed you.

As soon as you are ahead of the cyclist, use your interior and left door mirror to check you are clear and its safe to move back to normal driving position.

MSM it’s such a simple yet very effective routine but easily forgotten, which is why so many accidents occur daily on our roads.

Do you ever stop to think how do we survive on todays crowded roads.

You can only hope and pray that the other drivers sharing the same roads you are travelling on are competent drivers who practice the Mirror – Signal – Manoeuvre routine.

Anticipation: The “What if” part of driving!

Well, there’s another blog dedicated to this subject. But anticipating people performing a manoeuvre without checking the mirror or signalling their intentions, is a skill you’ll also need to get good at if you want to make it home at the end of the day unscathed.

So, make MSM a systemised sequence before you do anything when driving.

So, remember keep it simple and “Look Before You Do”.

Keep Safe.

 

#mirrorsignalmanoeuvre

 

How to prepare for your First Driving Lesson

Your first driving lesson…

It’s amazing how the world and how we see things has change in just a few months.

Businesses have had to quickly evolve by the way they deliver their products and services to meet this new world.

So, what do you need to know before taking your first driving lesson?

When you book your First driving lesson we will ask you to allow your driving instructor to view your driving licence online.

Changes to driving licences came into effect on 8th June 2015, and therefore we need to make important licence checks to comply with our vehicle insures.

Endorsements, penalty points and driving bans are no longer recorded on driving licences, but will instead only be available online.

For insurance purposes, before your first lesson your driving instructor is required to check your licence details, so you will need to text your instructor with permission to view your licence online.

To do this you’ll need to generate a code which will allow your instructor to check your licence details:

You will need:

  • Your driving licence
  • Your national insurance number
  • Your home postcode
  • The code will only be valid for 21 days.

You can go to this website to get your code:

https://www.gov.uk/view-driving-licence

Don’t forget your instructor will still need to see your photocard licence for ID inspection on your first driving lesson. He or she will take a photo of your card avoiding touching it.

 

How we are managing health and safety in the training vehicle

It’s a new future and this is OUR RESPONSE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC AND GETTING BACK TO TAKING LESSON.

As of the 4th July 2020, we have been granted by the government to start taking driving lessons again. For your safety, please make sure you adhere to the following rules.

It’s your safety, and the safety of everyone who uses the tuition vehicle, including your instructor that we aim to protect, so failure to comply with these Covid-19 safety measures may result in your lesson being cancelled.

PLEASE MAKE SURE YOU ARE PREPARED BY FOLLOWING THE SAFETY MEASURES BELOW:

The vehicles will be well vented, with windows open. In hot weather, as well as windows opened, the air conditioning may be turned on.

– A face mask or covering should be worn wherever practical. Please bring your own face covering with you, if you do not come prepared with a mask, the instructor will have a disposable one available for you to use. Please avoid wearing a plastic visor for safety reasons. In the event of an accident, plastic visors may and can cause a lot of harm in the event of an air bag being deployed, causing the visor to shatter.

– Gloves should be worn at all times. If you cannot bring your own gloves, the instructor will have disposable ones for your use. Please note, if you have any allergy issues with common disposable gloves, such as latex, please bring your own for your safety. It is your responsibility to make this known to the instructor.

– Please make sure your hands are freshly washed using anti-bacterial handwash before the lesson starts. If you are wearing your own gloves that have been used previously, please wash them in an antibacterial liquid.

– Sanitiser will be provided in the vehicle for your use.

– Disposable seat covers will be changed after every pupil. This is to ensure the cleanest and safest possible environment for both you, and others taking lessons.

– If you are showing any symptoms of Covid-19 (see NHS website for more information), please DO NOT attend your lesson, we will not charge for the cancellation.

If you have symptoms and have not cancelled your lesson prior to the instructor turning up, your instructor will refuse to continue the lesson, and you could still be charged for that full lesson. So, please cancel if you know you are not well.

 

WHAT THE INSTRUCTOR WILL DO TO ENSURE THE SAFEST ENVIRONMENT POSSIBLE:

– The instructor may wear a mask or face covering, and gloves.

– The instructor will clean the vehicle thoroughly after each lesson with antibacterial car sanitiser, including all common areas of the vehicle such as the: steering wheel, Hand brake, Gear lever, Indicators and other buttons, seat adjusters, mirrors and accessories, door handles and so forth.

– The instructor will deep clean the vehicle at the end of every working day.

– Because the instructor needs to clean down the car after every lesson, we cannot accommodate hourly lessons at this time, and we will only be taking longer lessons for the foreseeable future. If you are unsure as to what time duration you can take, please ask your instructor directly,

 

Eyesight, health conditions, drink & drugs  

The instructor will also ask you to complete an eyesight check & if you cannot pass this they will advise an eye test with a professional which may mean you need to complete any eye tests & corrective procedures before we continue with any further lessons.

You must advise your instructor of any health conditions which are on the DVLA list of notifiable conditions before commencing any driving lessons.  It is your legal responsibility to notify the DVLA of any health conditions: https://www.gov.uk/driving-medical-conditions.

You must not be under the influence of alcohol or drugs (including prescribed medication which states it may affect driving) during any lessons. You must consider carefully if you plan to drink alcohol the night before a lesson as the alcohol can remain in your system.

If you require any further information regarding taking driving lessons please email support@elite-driving-school.co.uk

 

 

Continuing to provide driving lessons in troubled times

Driving lessons in troubled times to the NHS

It might not be driving lessons as usual, but we can continue helping the NHS key workers to stay safe so they can continue helping us!

As the UK lock down shows some signs of easing the social distancing guidelines are still in place, which means no driving lessons.

The government haven’t mentioned driving instructors or driving lessons in any recent bulletin, and so we remain uncertain as to when we can get back to work.

Thousands of people are poised ready to start or continue driving lessons, but for the moment driving schools are still closed to all but front line workers.

But their is some good news;

NHS front line worker Yahya Khedr passed his essential driving test today at his FIRST attempt.


Yahya an NHS key worker who was previously driving on an international licence still found it quite nerve racking taking a driving test, but still managed to pass with a virtual clean sheet.

Yahya now plans to buy a car as soon as possible to avoid relying on buses, and taxis to get to work.

The BIG Question, when can you start to take driving lessons again?

There may already be a few instructors back to work, but most driving schools are waiting for some sort of confirmation to go back from either the DVSA or the government.

Whether this will come in June or July no one knows but it would be a nice gesture if some government official actually acknowledged the driving instruction industry, and gave us some dates.

We are planning to return on the 6th July unless we here otherwise, so if you want to beat the rush to book driving lessons call us today and book in advance.

03332 004130

In the meantime, I’ll keep you posted.

Update regarding driving lessons after the Governments latest announcement.

The Governments latest announcement.

 

The Prime Ministers announcement on the 10th May didn’t make it clear as to who can get back to work and who cannot.

So, due to the confusion we have asked our instructors not to take anyone except key workers out on driving lessons for the time being, until we get clarification from the government and the DVSA that it is safe for us to give driving lessons to all.

Of course when we do get back to work, there will be some changes due to the corvid-19 government guidelines.

We have spoken with virus specialists in the medical profession, and listened to advice from the DVSA and government about creating a safe environment for people to learn.

Our major priority is focused on our customers and our instructors safety throughout these unusual times, which means new regulations have been put in place to create a safe learning environment within our vehicles.

Beat the rush

We expect a lot of bookings once we receive confirmation that it’s safe to offer driving lessons as usual. Which means the best way to beat the rush is to pre-pay for your driving lessons, which of course means that we will endeavour to start your lessons straight away.

If there is a delay getting back to work, then any pre-paid lessons will be held in credit for up to 12 months.

If you are a key worker we are still able to offer driving lessons, and we can help you learn fast as well as assist you in getting a confirmed driving test date with a DVSA driving examiner.

We are looking forward to getting back to doing what we do best, and helping our students pass their driving test quickly and first time.

To book your driving lessons please call 03332 004130.

 

The latest from the Prime Minister:

 

 

#safedrivinglessons

Why Emotions Play an Important Role in Learning to Drive

Emotions, why do they play such a big role in driving?

Emotions in your body can alter your physical state.

Emotions such as fear, anger, guilt, contempt, and embarrassment precede feelings. The feeling is what you associate to the emotion.

Feelings are mental associations and reactions to emotions, and are subjective being influenced by personal experience, beliefs, and memories.

A feeling is a mental portrayal of what is going on in your body when you have an emotion and is the byproduct of your brain perceiving and assigning meaning to the emotion.

Your emotions and feelings play a powerful role in how you experience and interact with the world because they are the driving force behind many behaviors, helpful and unhelpful.

Emotions can effect the way we drive or react to everyday situations for example other drivers.

Often learners feel harassed by other drivers, whether they are behind, ahead, or at a junction.

Although other drivers can be attributed to why a learner might stall their vehicle at a traffic light, they are not the problem.

It starts with the learners emotions. The learner might feel fear in this situation, they become afraid of stalling the vehicle, which they assume will result in anger or contempt from other drivers.

The pressure on the learner to get the vehicle moving now becomes huge, and if the learner panics when the lights change, they will rush with the controls resulting in a stall.

It’s difficult for the instructor in this situation, because no matter how hard they try to calm and reassure the learner, the anxiety the learner feels forces them to rush and the vehicle stalls again.

So, thereafter every time the learner is in the same situation they feel anxious, and their focus is on stalling rather than smooth use of the control’s to get the car moving

So in this situation the emotion the learner feels is associated with a memory from an earlier mistake made, but it can also be from a similar experience passed from person to person.

In a conversation with others in a group, one of the members tells the story of how they stalled the vehicle virtually every time the came to a stop.

Their heart would start pounding, their breathing would become rapid and sallow, and they would actually start sweating at the thought of having to get the vehicle moving.

In fact it got so bad that it forced them to stop their driving lessons because the fear of stalling became greater than the desire to drive.

So, experiences from other people can be so powerful that it can often be passed on to others.

So how do they overcome the feeling they get from the emotion?

This is easier said than done, but by understanding the difference and becoming aware of your emotions and feelings, you will learn to respond rather than react and driving will magically become more under your control.

So, the next time you are stationary at traffic lights and you start to become anxious, you can respond to the feeling and become determined to focus on using the controls smoothly resulting with the vehicle pulling away easily.

When you master the skill of choosing your feelings and behaviors, life behind the wheel will settle down, and you’ll become a calmer, and  less stressed driver.

 

#emotionaldrivers

 

 

 

 

First time driving test pass for Jamie Pickering

First time driving test pass for Jamie Pickering, he nailed it from the start and never looked back!

 

A Huge Congratulations to Jamie Pickering for passing his driving test first time on Friday 24th January 2020 with just two minor faults!!
The 24th January is a day Jamie will always remember as the day he earned his wheels.


Elite instructor Rob Caton said: Jamie got a really demanding test route but definitely rose to the challenge and passed with flying colours!!
Well done matey and thanks for the huge jar of humbugs!!
My students know what I like!!
We would like to wish Jamie a happy safe driving future from all the team at Elite Driving School

#firsttimedrivingtestpasshull

7 Top tips for people training to become a driving instructor

We frequently get asked for top tips to focus on when training to become a driving instructor.

I have put together 7 top training tips which will make sure your focus is on maximising  your time more effectively, while getting the most out of your training and hopefully keeping more money in your pocket.

  1. Have a plan with targets

Have a plan which includes a realistic deadline for each area of the training program, which should be worked out by how much time you can commit to training each week or month.

I find that if starting from scratch, you should allow 4 weeks for your DBS check to be returned, then a further 2 weeks wait for your DVSA reference number to arrive so that you can book your part one theory exam, which generally has a waiting time of 4 weeks.

2. Working out your training agenda

Now that you know that you could be waiting 10 weeks on basically just getting registered and booking your first test, don’t waste a moment of that time, because it’s the ideal time to start your preparation for ADI part one theory test.

10 weeks is a sufficient amount of time to read the books, & study your part one course material.

If you can manage to put aside one and a half hours for training, four times a week, in 10 weeks you will have clocked up 60 hours of study time.

Use a part one training program because will give you a structure to follow so that you are not wasting time.

3. Don’t wait until you pass one test BEFORE YOU start training for the next

While you are studying for the part one you might want to book a part two driving assessment.

The benefit of the assessment is that your trainer will give you a report of your driving performance which will include areas of your driving where improvements can be made.

This means you’ve got plenty of time to start working on creating good habits every time you go for a drive in your own car, while at the same time improving your knowledge with the theory element of the course.

This will save you time a money when it’s comes to taking part two training, and again allows you to book your part two test as soon as you’ve passed the theory test, which will give you another goal to aim for.

Once again you can start preparation for the part three instructional element of the course while practicing for the practical test, so not a moment of your time is being frittered away twiddling your thumbs.

4. Don’t waste you valuable time in the training vehicle

It’s common for people training on the part three instructional module to waste time writing out their lesson plan in the car with the trainer.

As a qualified instructor you will already have your lesson plan in place before arriving for your student, which means you’ll have the aims and objectives for the lesson in place, with the goals you want to acheive and the route you intend to use.

There’s no wasted time for the student either because you are prepared, and can immediately start the lesson with a conversation.

The conversation will cover the previous lesson, recapping on area’s where they made good progress as well as discussing points where you both feel improvements can be made, before talking through the the lesson plan in detail.

You should follow the same routine before you get into the training vehicle, where you’ll then have time to then discuss your lesson plan with the trainer before putting it into practice.

5. Keep in contact with the training team

Do be a stranger while training. It’s common for trainee’s to disappear off the radar during training especially while studying for the theory element.

Without regular contact with the training organisation, or trainer you won’t have anyone to make you accountable for studying.

So, keep in touch, let them know how far forward you are with the training program, and if you need help ask for it, or if you have questions ask them.

6. Book tests in advance

Some training schools will book your test on your behalf, while others will leave you do book them yourself.

You can waste a lot of time waiting for tests, especially ADI tests because generally there is just one examiner at your local test centre who is responsible, for all ADI tests.

So book them as soon as you can, choose a date you feel you can complete the training for that element of the course and, I would recommend talking with your trainer before making any bookings for their advice.

7. Go on a trainee PDI licence

The part three training will be mostly role play with your trainer, with some full licence holders thrown in for practice.

You might be in a fortunate position where you have a good training vehicle of your own that you can fit dual controls into.

This allows you to take friends and family out for practice (obviously without charge).

However not everyone can afford the expense of buying a car for practice, so in this case I would recommend going on to a trainee licence with a driving school.

The school will provide a training vehicle, insurance and pupils. It’s hands on experience because you are teaching real learners, and you can earn while you learn.

But don’t expect a full time wage, because a trainee licence only lasts for six months and it’s purpose is to get practice before taking your part three test.

So expect to pay the school for the car, their costs, and customers plus additional training while on the trainee licence.

If you are working full time in a job while training then a trainee licence might not be an option for you because of cost, unless the school can provide a vehicle on a part time basis.

In this instance you can do a couple of lessons on a weekend and the school gets the full fee from the student for the loan of the vehicle.

Another option is that you might be lucky enough to live in an area where car rental companies hire out dual controlled driving instructor training vehicles on an hourly basis, complete with insurance.

If you are on a trainee licence you can take people for lessons in return of them paying the car hire fees and fuel, so you both benefit.

 

If you need any advice or just want to chat about training to become a driving instructor, or what it’s like working as an instructor please call Kev on 03332 004130

 

#trainingtobecomeadrivinginstructor

 

What do you do on your first driving lesson as a new driver?

Your first driving lesson as a new driver, and this is what you can expect to learn.

 

Driving instructors follow the Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency’s (DVSA) syllabus for driving cars and light vans. This syllabus aims to provide a structured approach to gaining the skills, knowledge and understanding to be a safe and responsible road-user in this class of vehicle.

The first thing you will learn is about your vehicle and it’s controls which we covered in an earlier blog.

In this blog we are going to cover moving the vehicle away from the kerb followed by pulling up alongside the kerb to stop for the first time.

Sound easy?

Well it might look easy when done by an experienced driver, but as a novice it’s your first driving challenge.

Let’s look at a system that driving instructors use to help you grasp the concept of moving the car.

The system is called POM which stands for Preparation, observation and manoeuvre. Each part of the system is broken down into its own elements making it easier to remember the sequence.

Some people new to learning might already have an idea of how to move a car and should be given the opportunity to explain how they would accomplish the task and the risks involved.

By doing so helps the instructor to gain and understanding of a student’s knowledge.

But let’s look at how to use POM to assist you in the task of moving the vehicle.

So, the instructor first role is to explain about gauging the vehicles distance from the kerb so that the student can steer away from the kerb and return the vehicle to the kerb to stop safely, without damaging the vehicle.

This literally involves finding a reference point that the learner can use as a basic guide. A common method is to note where the kerb touches the cars body work or windscreen. In the picture below of a stationary vehicle the kerb can be seen just left of the fixing point on the passenger side (left hand) wiper blade.

First driving lessons the kerb

This means that if we steer the vehicle to the right (away from the kerb) the kerb will move further away from the driver towards the left of the wiper blade, as we steer left, the kerb will move back towards the original starting position.

The skill is not letting the kerb move to the right beyond the original position on the wiper blade, because this will result in striking the kerb with the vehicles left front wheel.

 

your first driving lesson

POM: Preparation:

Preparing the vehicle ready to drive.

Firstly, check that handbrake is on and that the gear lever is in the neutral position. Give the gear lever a good rattle both right and left, get used to knowing the difference between the car being in gear and in neutral.

Next, follow the sequence, depress the clutch pedal to the floor, Select first gear using the palm of the hand, set a tad of gas in other words slightly increase the engine speed, bring the clutch steadily upwards until you reach the biting point. The biting point is where the engine is taking the strain of the vehicles weight. You should hear the engine taking the strain and maybe even feel the front of the vehicle lift very slightly.

If ether engine noise or vehicle lift sound or feel excessive, slightly depress the clutch by the thickness of a one-pound coin and continue doing so until you feel the engine has the strain without putting it under stress.

If you can’t feel the biting point, then depress the clutch to the floor and try again.

Once at biting point keep both feet still and move on to observations.

What is biting point?

Imagine you’re in the iron man challenge and one exercise is pulling a truck. Your first priority is to take the weight of the truck by taking up the slack on the rope around your body.

Now you know that an enormous amount of effort is going to be required to get the truck moving and that it will take small steps at the start until you find momentum, which is when it gets easier to move the truck.

first driving lesson biting point

Well this is the same for the vehicle’s engine.

The biting point is talking the strain, and then a slight upward movement of the clutch is required to move the vehicle, but pressure must remain on the pedal until the vehicle gets momentum with forward movement, then you should steadily lift the pedal until your foot can come off the pedal.

 

Your first driving lesson

Observations.

Next at biting point keep both feet still until you’ve checked all around the car that it’s safe to move. You are checking for any road users which includes cyclists, motor cyclists, cars, vans’ busses, lorry’s and pedestrians in the road.

You should start your observations by looking over your left shoulder into the blind spot, which is the area to the side of the vehicle that cannot be seen through either the interior mirror or door mirror.

Then move your head clockwise until you can see the blind area clearly over your right shoulder, while taking in to account anything between the two points, and making sure you check all three mirrors during the process.

Your first driving lesson

Manoeuvre:

Now that you can see it’s safe to move the vehicle from the kerb, you can release the handbrake.

Next lift the clutch slightly up until the car starts to move and then maintain pressure on the clutch pedal.

Increase the pressure to the gas to give the engine more power, as the car moves steer right 10 minutes past twelve until the car is approximately one meter away from the kerb, then steer left 10 minutes before twelve, finally centring the steering wheel once the car is parallel to the kerb and in the centre of the your lane.

By this point the vehicle should know have momentum so steadily let the clutch fully up and take your foot off it.

You are now under control with the engine and you can increase pressure to the gas pedal to increase the vehicles speed and reduce pressure to slow the vehicle.

So, remember POM 

Preparation = Clutch down, 1st gear, slight gas, clutch to biting point.

Observations = start by looking over you left should, move your head clockwise until you can see over your right shoulder, checking every area between the two points.

Manoeuvre = Release handbrake, clutch up slightly, increase gas, steer away from the kerb and bring the vehicle parallel to the kerb, clutch steadily all the way up.

 

On the Next Blog we will talk about bringing the car back towards the kerb and stopping.

 

#firstdrivinglesson

 

What does passing the driving test mean to you?

Passing the driving test is a big milestone in most people lives, and it opens their world up to a whole lot of possibilities.

 

Jack Hadfield passed the driving test on Monday 28th September 2019, a date he’ll never forget.

passing the driving test
Congratulations to Jack Hadfield

Jack passed the driving test with just one minor fault from an otherwise clean sheet, which was an excellent result.

Jack has a car sat waiting in his drive ready for him to drive, so the pressure to pass was on, and cool Jack didn’t disappoint.

Jack’s at the university and will soon get a placement which means he can drive himself rather than wait on other to get him there.

That’s just one of the many benefits Jack’s got to look forward to for many years to come.

So, if you want to join Jack and get your full driving licence, then book your driving lessons with an Elite driving instructor, and you’ll be driving before you know it.

 

#passingthedrivingtest