ADI training part three 2nd session

ADI training part three, the story so far

 

ADI training part three 2nd session & Wow, 25 years away form the driver training industry and the teaching methods have really changed.

Sitting in the passenger seat instructing feels alien. You wouldn’t believe I’d been an instructor in the past.

The first thing I noticed are all the new road layouts in the city. I don’t normally travelĀ  around these area’s so planning the route has led to a few hiccups.

There were few roundabouts I totally cocked up on directions. The first was at the end of mount pleasant, where you can no longer turn right.

The second was at a roundabout in Hessle. We had just left the A63 at what I call the B&Q roundabout heading towards the flyover in Hessle, the one where Asda is.

I asked Stu to take the first exit, before noticing that a new super market had been plonked to the left. The result could have caused confusion had Stu put a signal on. Fortunately he entered the roundabout passing the exit of the car park first before signalling.

Stu recommended I put some miles into driving around the city and re-learning the roads and new layouts.

But, the big change to teaching is the DVSA’s desire for instructors to be client centered in their training. I gather this is one change many ADI’s themselves are struggling with.

I’ve found there’s a lot of confusion among instructors, and it seems as though the DVSA haven’t been clear about what client centered learning looks like in today’s lessons.

Stu’s got client centered nailed, but he said ADI’s are seeking help to understand what the DVSA want, especially from those ADI’s who have been invited for a standards check.

Any way back to my part three training. My early sessions are the role play method, before we move on and find students for me to teach.

Stu put me in control, and left me to decide which lesson theme we would be practicing, and what level the student’s knowledge and ability would be.

Eager not to start at too high a level, I chose a trained pupil at a reasonable standard, but not yet ready for a test as the character Stu would role play. And the lesson theme I decided to tackle was defensive driving.

Now to be clear, we didn’t treat the role play like the old part 3 role play scenario. Stu portrayed as near as dam it a real learner consistently making mistakes throughout the lesson aimed at throwing me off the lesson theme.

I started the lesson with a recap of the previous lesson covering what was learnt and what we had agreed to work on this lesson.

I asked questions that probed his knowledge and helped him find solutions that would help him fix the mistakes made from the previous lesson.

We agreed on the lesson structure, and who would be responsible for the various roles during the lesson.

“Ok Stu, have you got your seat in the correct position and mirrors adjusted correctly, yes? right then move away when safe please” was my instruction.

Within the first 10 seconds we found ourselves leaving the car park we were in via an exit that had a blind view to the left due to overgrown foliage.

And, a blind bend 50 meters to the right to contend with. I asked Stu, to point out the danger, and how we should deal with it safely.

He said that his main worry was a vehicle coming quickly round the bend while he was creeping out into the junction to get a clear view of the left.

We agreed that it would be the best practice for him to lean forward and quickly check both sides constantly until we were sure there was not danger from the left, then at that point we could briskly emerge to the right before a vehicle could be upon us.

 

A good start I thought, even though we’d only traveled a few hundred feet.

As the lesson progressed, I identified errors Stu was making and relayed them back to him with the dangers that they could cause, and what was needed to avoid these mistakes again.

The more serious problems, and those difficult to talk about on the move, I pulled Stu up on the left for a chat. This was an area which wasn’t great for me because I was telling and not questioning as the DVSA wanted.

Ask questions that probes their knowledge. This approach will help you understand their thinking and then you can help them find a solution that they can focus on to resolve their mistakes, Stu said.

Easier said than done, because the original method of instruction I was taught 30 years previously, is to tell them what they’ve done wrong, explain why it was wrong, and demonstrate the correct way to do it, simples.

Anyway, at the end of the lesson after my debrief, Stu gave me some examples of using client centered techniques during a students debrief, which would help me gain valuable feedback and in turn help both myself and my student understanding where the gaps in their knowledge might be.

My my big learn from today is to ‘listen more talk less (something my partner reminds me to do often), ask better quality questions and understand the needs of my students’.

 

Watch out for my next post, the journey so far.

“Till next time”

See ya.