New Drivers Could Face Second Driving Test After Two Years

New Drivers Could Face Second Driving Test After Two Years

This is such a controversial topic. It’s easy to understand why the government would want to implement these rules such as: No driving at Night; Only driving cars with smaller engines; taking another driving test after 2 years. It is a huge operation that they’re proposing. So I am going to break it down so we can make a proper evaluation of the proposed.

I agree with the government. Too many young lives are lost each year, as they cause a quarter of all road accidents. That is a lot. I do feel that some form of implementation needs to take place in order for this to be reduced.

Let’s take each point, one step at a time.

Pleas take the time to read the full article, before reading our ideas and thoughts by clicking here.

 

“Not be able to drink alcohol before driving because of a lowered drink drive limit”.

Now this one seems like a no brainer. Alcohol effects the way we drive, that’s just common knowledge. At age 17, although drinking alcohol is illegal, until the age of 18 in the UK, we know that 17’s drink. They’re also allowed to drink alcohol from the age of 16 in a pub or bar, as long as they’re having a meal, and it is bought by an adult, and they are accompanied by an adult. This is limited to beer, cider and wine.

Additionally, from the age of 5, they are legally allowed to drink alcohol in their own home. a 17 year old has not had the chance to build up the same tolerance to alcohol as someone older. Because it is illegal, they do not go out to pubs and bars to drink, unlike people of age.

Therefore, they get drunk faster, meaning that the even a small amount of alcohol can easily effect them. I think there should be a no drink and drive policy completely in the UK, as with the amount of transport now available, there is no need.

Additionally, I am sure that parents would rather have to come and collect their kids from the club at 3am, knowing they’re safe, rather than letting them dangerously drink drive. They may huff and puff about it, but they’d prefer it.

“Have to take another test at the end of the two-year probation period”.

This is both a good and a bad idea. I’m sure many will have their own thoughts on having to take another driving test. Driving tests are stressful, and expensive.

So what is supposed to happen at the end of the second test, if you fail?

And what if you haven’t driven for that entire 2 year period? This is modelled on the USA, but the difference is, the 16, 17 and 18 year olds can all drive their parents car no problem, because of the different way the insurance works.

Over here, buying a car, insuring it, MOTing it, Servicing it, and taxing it can cost a LOT. Insurance for new drivers somewhere around £2,000; MOT £30.00 but then need to pay for fixing.

Car tax, dependant on car. Car from £2,000 – £10,000. What 17 year old can afford this?! Especially with the new laws that you now have to remain in education until you’re 18 years of age, and must do some form of educational route, such as college, apprenticeships etc.

And the majority of parents can’t afford to pay that for their children, as it it pretty much half the general wage of  a UK resident.

So, what happens, if you haven’t driven in the 2 year period?

Will there be special allowances for that?

It’s common for 17 year olds to do lessons for their 17th birthday, so they get it over and done with.

Therefore, the teen is going to be at least 19, (most probably) away at university, and has to come and do another driving test, after having no practice in 2 years?

I think its a good idea, as it will insure that they are capable to come off the probation period, but I can’t imagine how it will work effectively.

“Not be able to drive after dark or drive cars with larger engines”

Okay, so this is the one that doesn’t make the most sense to me. In America, it has been adopted in some states, that driving between certain hours without supervision is prohibited.

In England, that wouldn’t work. Especially considering that in Winter we have about 6 hours of actual Daylight, so how are they supposed to get to and from college/school/work, without travelling in the dark?

They’re learning and working when its light, and then at 3:00pm, it gets dark.

Most schools tend to kick out between 3 and 4pm. So surely, that couldn’t work? And then that leads to the point, that surely, more accidents happen during the day, during rush hour, when people are running late, rushing and being less cautious, then at night, when there are hardly any cars around?

I get that its dark, making vision more impaired, but that happens at 3:00pm in the UK, so surely, they can’t have a curfew that early?

And if they were allowed to drive until say 8:00pm, the whats the difference driving at that time, than 2:00am with less cars?

It is still the same amount of darkness.

Larger engines is interesting though, because they are extremely powerful, and should be used by more experienced drivers, I think. They handle a lot harder than a smaller car, and they are also a lot more expensive to insure. I don’t think that there should be a problem after the 2 year probation period, but during the 2 year period, I think smaller engines should be used only.

 

What do you think to these proposed new laws? We’d love to hear your idea on them, and if you think they will work. Let us know!

-Elite HQ

The Best Driving Tunes

The Best Driving Tunes

A compiled list of the 50 best driving songs, to get you through the cold weather (well, in our opinion!)

We love driving, but in Winter, it can be treacherous, which is why we believe, the right playlist can turn that frown, upside down! Here are a list of songs, that we think can get you through the rubbish weather!

(Please note that these are not in order, we probably love them all equally)

  • Don’t stop Believing – Journey
  • Somebody to Love – Queen
  • Make you Feel My Love – Adele (for those rainy days, where you want to look out the window and pretend you’re in a super sad music video)
  • Bitter Sweet Symphony – The Verve
  • There She Goes – The La’s
  • Stacey’s Mom – Fountains of Wayne
  • Bring Me To Life – Evanescence
  • This is Me – Keala Settle, The Greatest Showman Soundtrack
  • Video Games – Lana Del Rey
  • Everlong – Foo Fighters
  • Iris – The Goo Goo Dolls
  • You and Me Song – The Wannadies
  • Alive – Sia
  • Somewhere Only We Know – Keane
  • Wherever You Will Go – The Calling
  • Secrets – One Republic
  • Move Along – The All American Rejects
  • Drunk In Love – Beyonce
  • Little Lion Man – Mumford and Sons
  • Feeling Good – Michael Buble
  • I Wanna Dance with Somebody – Whitney Houston
  • I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor – Arctic Monkeys
  • Yellow – Coldplay
  • Walking on Sunshine – Katrina and the Waves
  • What I Like About You – the Romantics
  • Twist and Shout – the Beatles
  • Summer of ’69 – Bryan Adams
  • Hey Soul Sister – Train
  • Sweet Child O’ Mine – Guns N Roses
  • Before He Cheats – Carrie Underwood
  • Runnin’ (Lose it All) – Naughty Boy, Beyonce
  • Jolene – Dolly Parton
  • Piano Man – Billy Joel
  • Human – Rag’n’Bone Man
  • Secret Love Song – Little Mix
  • Power – Little Mix
  • Radioactive – Imagine Dragons
  • Mr Brightside – The Killers
  • I’ll be There for You – The Rembrandts
  • Gold Digger – Kanye West, Jamie Foxx
  • Shine – Take That
  • Need You Now – Lady Antebellum
  • Sex On Fire – Kings of Leon
  • Highway to Hell – AC/DC
  • Jessie’s Girl – Rick Springfield
  • I’m a Believer – The Monkees
  • Wild Ones – Flo Rida ft. Sia
  • With or Without You – U2
  • Numb – Linkin Park
  • Half the World Away – Oasis

So what do you think? We think that this makes a killer playlist for Road Tripping!

What songs would you like to see on here?

Let us know in the comments, or on Facebook!

-Elite HQ

New in Driving News

Hello everyone and Welcome to the Elite Driving School Blog’s New in Driving News!

There has been a lot of Driving News lately, mainly, revolving around the weather!

However, last week, it was announced that Learner Drivers would be allowed on the motorways, with a qualified Driving Instructor, as of the 4th June 2018!

I have both good and points for the debate of Learner Drivers being allowed on motorways…

Let’s get all the negativity out of the way, and start with the cons:

-Motorways are dangerous if going both too fast, or too slow. Going too slow on a Motorway can cause serious problems, and can be very dangerous, which is why generally, it is better to do when more competent.

-Realistically, in an average hour/hour and a half lesson, the Learner isn’t going to get very far, before having to turn around and come back home. It is going to be extremely difficult for those who don’t live anywhere near a motorway, to have a motorway lesson as a learner…right?

-Thy’re unreliable. This shouldn’t be too difficult to explain, but sometimes, for unforeseen circumstances, you can get stuck on the motorway for hours. I’m sure we have all been there. Just last week, people were stuck on the M62 for 15 hours, after a mass crash. – Could you imagine being stuck in a car for 15 hours with your instructor?

-The other road users. You can sometimes get people, who get a little ‘speed happy’ and tend to just zoom off, well over the speed limit. This of course is annoying to general road users, never mind learners, who haven’t even passed a test to determine if they are ready to drive safely or not. I can imagine it being quite scary.

-They’re unqualified. Sure, they’re with a qualified instructor, who can drive at an advanced level, and in a car with dual controls, but that doesn’t prevent the fact that they’re unqualified. And yes, I understand the point of this is to become qualified, but people generally learn or go on a motorway, after they have experienced driving on their own on A and B roads.

Okay. Now, for the Pro’s:

-It allows the learner to advance on the skills that they already have, to be able to assess the situation appropriately.

-It allows learners to be experienced on all roads, before becoming qualified.

-With the new ‘Smart Motorways’ it enables learners to be more aware of how they work, as they won’t be involved in the Theory test.

-It gives them an advanced knowledge, meaning that there could potentially be fewer ‘new driver’ accidents.

 

What do you think?

We would love to hear your thoughts on the subject, as I think it is such a controversial one.

– The Elite Team

 

The New Driving Test January edition

The New Driving Test January edition

We’ve reached the end of the first month since the new driving test was introduced, and these are our finding so far:

There was a massive surge in people trying to book their driving test before the new driving test was introduced, but in reality the new test isn’t any more challenging than the old one.

Yeah, sure there’s a few changes, but what’s the difference?

Well there’s a few new manoeuvres, which many instructors were already teaching during lessons well before they were introduced to the test, so no big change there.

Some of old manoeuvres have been axed, one being my least favored the reverse left, because of the difficulty in finding convenient roads to practice this manoeuvre, and my empathy for other drivers who had to patiently wait while the student completed the manoeuvre.

One of the new manoeuvres which caused a plethora of complaints from both ADI’s and examiners, is still proving to be unpopular. This manoeuvre requires the student to park on the right hand side of the road, facing oncoming traffic, before being asked to reverse two car lengths and then moving off when safe to do so.

I personally don’t see this manoeuvre as a difficult one, but I do understand why it’s the cause of so many complaints. I think the DVSA might have to re-evaluate this one!

Another part of the test that doesn’t seem to have been well thought out, is the independent drive using the sat nav.

The DVSA provide their own sat nav unit’s. The major problems here are 1) mounting the unit, and 2) what happens if the student goes off route.

  1. Mounting the unit. We’ve seen examiners using non slip dash mats to sit the sat nav on. The problem is that the units vibrate around, and slides off, which results in the examiner trying to recover the unit, and then hold it in place until the end of the independent drive section.

Big distraction for the student.

Yes, before you ask; Examiners have been supplied windscreen mounting brackets, but some cars have proven impossible to use these types of mounts, and they can cause problems with the airbags, especially in the new, and very popular Citroen C3.

With so many different cars used by driving instructors, and the shape of the modern dash, you’ve got to sympathise with the examiners.

A number of examiners have also complained about the difficulty in mounting these units, as it causes them discomfort, especially to their back while trying to fit the windscreen suction brackets.

2) The DVSA provide their own sat nav’s which have pre-programmed routes in them. A major problem we’ve been told about already, is should the student take a wrong turn the sat nav (which you would expect) re-calculates the route. But because the route is already pre-programmed, this causes the problem.

The examiner has to intervene with new directions while the sat nav is still barking out an alternative route. Very confusing indeed.

The examiner then has to manually end the route on the sat nav, in mid lesson.

Now I’m sure you can foresee a real problem that might occur in the future if a better alternative isn’t found by the DVSA.

We suggest, using the sat nav provided by the instructor, which can be quickly programmed by the instructor before the test, or by the student during the test to guide them back to the test center as part of the independent drive.

Food for thought.

 

 

 

#thenewdrivingtest, #independentdrive, #manoeuvres

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year from Elite Driving School!

We hope that you have all had an excellent Christmas break, and a lovely New Year.

I wanted to talk today about the meaning of New Years, and what it symbolises to people.

There are so many promotional slurs going around at new year, most of them centralising around the popular ‘New Year New Me’.

Here at Elite, I don’t believe that it is really a ‘New You’.

I see life as a book, or a collection of books, and this new year is simply a new chapter, or a new story. The year hasn’t even been written yet, so you can fill it with whatever you want. The new year means that there are 365 opportunities (1 per day), and you can write those days with anything you want.

This is your life, and you can do what you want with it.

This is your life, so you should be driving it.

Be in control of your own life.

So many people start off the year with resolutions, and things they’re going to stop/start doing.

But really, we could do this any time of the year.

So Even if you’re already feeling defeated with whatever resolutions you have made, just remember that you can write whatever you want in your book of life. If you want to start healthy eating again in June, do it. That’s still half a chapter, half a year to progress.

But if you’re like me and you want to get started at the beginning of the year, then do it.

Want to lose weight? Try building up to it, go for walks, but don’t throw yourself into the deep end if you don’t want.

Want to learn to drive? Then call today and book in. Trust me, it will be the best thing you do.

Wan’t to change jobs? Then do it. There is no point being unhappy for another year, because your life is precious, and you deserve to have happiness throughout.

Did you know that we also train people to become driving instructors?

At Elite, we are a franchise, and so you will be your own boss, but with an entire established company backing you, to help make your dreams a reality.

If you want to find out more about driving lessons or driving instructor training please call: 01482 772327 today!

Part One ADI Theory test

Sitting the Part One ADI Theory test

 

In this blog I’ll tell you about my experience of taking the theory test and my help tips to get the most out of your time.

But first I want to address the problem associated with setting aside time to study.

I recently received a message from Rob who’s studying for his part one ADI theory test.

Rob asked: “Any advise about the best way to study? I set aside a full day during week to study, but I didn’t get anything done.

Last week my study day didn’t go as planned. I started off by taking the kids to school because the wife was working. Then I did the weekly shop, followed by running a few errands. By the time I got round to study most of the day had gone, so I didn’t bother starting”.

Well Rob that’s the same for most busy people, because life gets in the way.

Allocating a full day to study is an ambitious plan. I prefer to break study down in to smaller chunks of time. I’ve found the ideal time for me is 90 minutes sessions, 3 to 4 times a week.

90 minutes is enough time to make headway, but not too long that it impacts on my day, or effects my concentration.

 

 

Back to the theory test:

Lesson number one: Don’t park in a restricted area that gives you a maximum of 2 hours waiting, otherwise you could walk out to a ticket.

When you arrive at the test center you’ll be asked for you’re driving licence, and given a key to a safety deposit box. You’ll be asked to put your jacket, phone and any other possessions you might have in your pockets, into the box.

Next your given a declaration to read before signing to say you agree with the rules.

Finally you’re asked to show that your pockets are empty for the camera., before taking a seat and waiting to be called through to your booth.

When your allocated a booth, you’ll be given the option to practice using the system, this doesn’t use up any of your theory test time so it’s worth taking a few minutes to get yourself focused, and get used to the set up.

When your ready select start the test. Keep an eye on the time which is at the top right of the screen, and the question number on the bottom right.

Read every question carefully before answering. Many answers are similar, and can be confusing, so reading them a few times might help you spot the correct answer easier. If in doubt mark the question so that you can return to it later, then your not wasting time or focus by stressing over the answer.

Once you’ve completed 100 questions, go back to those you highlighted and with the time remaining do your best to answer them correctly. Don’t leave any questions unanswered. Even a guess gives you more chance of getting it correct than not answering it at all.

Once you finish the questions you’ll be offered a 3 minute break before starting the hazard perception part of the test.

During this part of the test avoid repetitive clicking, but just a one click strategy might result in you clicking too early and you’ll score nothing. My tip is click every time you see a hazard, and click several more times when you know it’s turning into a potential danger. This increases your chance of getting in the scoring zone with a high score.

Once you’ve finished head back to the reception where you’ll be given your score. Before you leave the center don’t forget your possessions from the locker.

If you’ve been successful and passed, you can book your ADI part two practical driving test. click here

 

Gift Vouchers Now Available!

Did you know that we sold VOUCHERS?

Well we do! And they make the PERFECT present for Christmas, whether it’s for someone who has never driven before, or are already having lessons with us!

We sell them in bulks and can pretty much make up how any you want!

But we have set bulks too:

1.5 hour Voucher deal @ £36.00

2 hour Voucher deal@ £48.00

3 hour Voucher deal @ £69.00

5 hour Voucher deal @ £115.00

9 hour Voucher deal @ £203.00

20 hour Voucher deal @ £420.00

26 hour Voucher deal @ £546.00

32 hour Voucher deal @ £656.00

If you would like to order vouchers for someone, then now is the time to do so! There is only 18 days until Christmas 2017, so make sure you call in time for them to be sent and posted to you!

They make an excellent stocking filler too!

Call us now on: 01482 470151

Facebook us: Elite Driving School

Tweet us: @EliteDrivingSc1

Email us: support@elite-driving-school.co.uk

 

 

The ADI part one theory

The ADI part one theory

 

The big time drainer.

Starting a new career involves building new knowledge, experience and learning new skills.

 

ADI part one theory

 

The first step to becoming a driving instructor is learning the theory which is the first of the three parts required to become an Approved Driving Instructor with the DVSA.

This is a big time drainer, and in my experience can put many people off continuing through to qualification.

Those that do stick by and complete the theory can take a good 6 months or more before actually sitting the test.

It’s always been a goal of mine to discover why it takes so long, so I started the part one training for myself and sat the actual ADI part one exam.

What I found during my training has helped me understand why people fail to go beyond the first exam, and why others take too long to prepare.

First it’s worth mentioning that some training schools don’t include theory preparation in their training course. Instead at best they give you a list of the DVSA recommended reading material, and ask you to contact them after you’ve passed the part one test.

Others, ours included give you a complete step by step training manual, which guides you through reading relevant chapters from the supplied books and then testing you on your knowledge with multiple choice questions.

I started by following our own system, but I found the problem for me was the system was time draining, and could be slightly confusing because the course involves reading a few pages from multiple books at the same time.

Now if you’re not a good reader, that can hold you back.

I find it’s easier to read one book, before starting another because it takes me ages to get into a book. So jumping in and out of different books doesn’t particularly help me digest the information.

Anyway, I’d already set myself a brave time goal for re-educating myself for the part one test, and allocated 15 hours to research & study before sitting the exam for real.

For those of you that don’t know me, I trained to be a driving instructor 27 years ago. I qualified in 1989, worked for a few franchised driving schools before setting up my own driving school in 1991.

 

In 1995 I started a new business which was not in the driver training industry, and swapped my skills as a driving instructor for those of a business owner.

Driving sales, managing people and organising business is a mile away from sitting in a car teaching a student the skill of safe driving for life.

So I feel I’m in a good position to comment on the ADI part one theory, and in doing so find an alternative to the existing recommended study preparation methods.

Now, my first hurdle was finding time to study. I had already decided to put a few hours a side two nights a week, but I found that life has a habit of getting in the way. But in reality that’s merely an excuse for bad planning and lack of commitment which effects most people.

I started by following a recommended part one study guide, but it became too time consuming. And so I tried various other options from reading an entire book, to simply practicing on one of the many theory practice sites on the internet. But I found I wasn’t taking in the information with either option.

So, I looked for an alternative method to study, and with just 10 hours available I followed this system.

The part one test is in four banding, so I studied one band at a time. In each band I practiced multiple choice questions, marking questions I was sure i knew, followed by those I wasn’t certain about, and finally the questions I clearly didn’t know the answer to.

I could then go and read the book that gave the most information about the subject (band) i was working in, and if i needed more information I would find it in another book.

I would then re-visit the questions and see how much my knowledge had improved. This method helped me find the knowledge I lacked and helped me retain the information learnt.

My confidence grew and I started to get into the research, which was something that I didn’t get from simply reading, or practicing on the internet.

The Hazard Perception part of the test

I left a few hours to study the hazard perception part of the part one test, and I’ll explain how I dealt with that in the  next post. I’ll also share my results from the actual test with you…

 

 

 

#adipartonetheory

Register to train to become a driving instructor with the DVSA

Register to train to become a driving instructor with the DVSA

 

Once you have received your criminal record reference number, the next step is to register to train to become a driving instructor with the DVSA (Driving Vehicles Standard Agency).

Follow this link https://www.gov.uk/apply-to-become-a-driving-instructor

You will require your Criminal record reference which can be found at the top right of your letter.

First you will be asked to accept the user declaration, and then you should select the drop down option for ADI (Approved Driving Instructor). Next you’ll be asked for a user name and password (these are your own choice of details) which you can use every time you come back to the register to update or change your details, so keep them somewhere safe.

You will be asked for your personal details required by the DVSA. The form takes about 10 minutes to complete, but before logging out, please make sure to check that you have entered your information correctly.

After submitting your details, again expect a short wait of a week or so for a letter of registration approval to arrive from the DVSA.

You’re now ready to start the qualifying process, and I would recommend getting the ball rolling and pre-book your part one theory test.

You can choose a date from the many available. I would suggest giving yourself a six week goal to read the study material and prepare for the test.

If you’ve done as I suggested in the first post, and started to study while waiting for your criminal reference number, you might only need a few weeks to be ready to take the theory test.

A word of warning, don’t think of this as study to pass a test. You are learning and gaining the knowledge you’ll require to become a driving instructor. The more you know the better the instructor you’ll be, so it’s  important to do your research, and ask questions if you don’t understand something.

We recently asked two people to take a 20 question theory test. One person had done some online theory practice tests, and the other we asked to read the highway code.

 

Highway code

 

The person who used the online method got a score of 12 out of 20. The person who read the highway code scored 19 out of 20, and interestingly would have got 20 if he had read the question properly.

I came across a study a few years ago about how we approach learning, and they suggest you should embark upon study with the willingness to learn. You can’t become an expert without knowledge.

PDI’s (potential driving instructors) who skip reading the recommended books, and opt for the easier option of practicing online mock theory questions are less likely to pass the part one, and consequently end up struggling when they reach the final stage of the training.

Please note:  When studying the recommended books, you might find yourself reading words you don’t understand, so before moving forward find out the meaning of the words. Try using Google for help.

In the next blog I’ll show you methods to help your study progress smoothly, and i’ll also share tips to hep you get more done in less time.

 

Become a driving instructor criminal record check

Step One: Driving instructor criminal record check

 

Hi I’m Kev Goldthorpe founder of Elite driving school. I’m going to walk you through the entire process of training for a career as a driving instructor, starting with the driving instructor criminal record check.

So keep your eyes peeled because each week I’ll be posting new content.

 

 

Call it a step by step manual for training for a career as an Approved Driving Instructor (ADI).

The accreditation you are training for is the Driving Vehicle Standards Agency Approved Driving Instructor (DVSAADI) Green Badge, which authorises you to teach people to dive for a living.

Now you already know that you can help people learn to drive a car if you’re over 21, and have held a full UK licence for over 3 years, but you can’t legally charge them.

So it’s not a career until you hold the DVSAADI green badge, Which must be displayed in the tuition vehicle windscreen.

So let’s get the journey started. Now assuming you haven’t gone any further than the enquiry stage, and deciding it’s the career you want to pursue, to register as a potential driving instructor, you must be over 21 and have held a full driving licence in category B (manual cars) for at least 3 years. You must not have been disqualified during this time.

Step 1: Apply for a criminal record check for the DVSA.

Now you might already have a criminal record reference, but if it’s not for the DVSA, then it’s no good.

To apply for your criminal reference number click here

Take a note of the following information which you will need during the application process:

You’ll need to use the:

  • organisation PIN 105205
  • secret word axis
  • organisation name DVSA – PDI (PO)

Be certain to fill the document in correctly, I’ve know the post office turn people away for supplying the wrong ID, and GBG the online disclosure company send applications back because applicants put both their first and surname in the same space, instead of just surname.

Once you are happy that all your details and proofs are correct print the form off and hit submit.

Now you need to take the form and the ID’s you supplied on the form to the nearest post office.

PLEASE NOTE: Sub post offices do not offer the criminal record check verification service. You can only use main post offices, so to find your nearest click here, enter your post code and then select the  drop down box and check the option CRB & ID Verification Service, and hit search.

 

Driving instructor criminal record check post office

 

Don’t forget…

You’ll need to take a printed page from your online application with barcodes on it and 3 original forms of ID (not copies) that you entered during application which should be:

  • your passport
  • your driving licence
  • a utility bill that’s less than 3 months old
  • a bank statement that’s less than 3 months old

The service costs £6.

If takes anywhere from 1 to 6 weeks to get a reply. But if you’re convinced everything is okay, I would suggest starting to read the study books so your not wasting time.

The ADI part one theory can take some people months to study for it, but with proper planning, organisation and dedication this should only take a maximum of 8 weeks, so by starting now you’ll be able to book an early part one test date in your local town, cutting down the time and being one step closer to your dream of becoming a driving instructor.

What the video at the top of this blog, it will guide you through the process.

Watch out for the next step, registering with the DVSA to start training to become a driving instructor.

If you want to know more about a career as a driving instructor click here