The perfect learner mindset

Why you should get the right Learner Mindset!

 

For the average learner driving lessons are not cheap, on average a lesson cost £25 per hour but there’s a lot of expense that goes in to each lesson.

First your driving a car which is adapted for teaching which might be costing the instructor £450 a month, insurance is another £150, fuel £3 per hour, maintenance, tyres, tax, and that’s before we start adding marketing cost’s and extra insurance to the mix.

Then after all expenses the instructor get’s paid his hourly rate which we already know isn’t £25!

 

So, how can the savvy learner save money on lessons?

driving tips for new drivers

Well, here’s a few tips:

  1. Book the same day & lesson time each week, this conditions the mind for learning.
  2. Read information relevant to the previous lesson and the next lesson to keep your mind focused.
  3. Don’t skip lessons, make sure you’re there ready and on time every week.
  4. Be active in your lessons, rather than expect your instructor to tell you everything, be responsible for your own learning. Ask questions offer solutions to problems where you can.
  5. If possible book lessons when your not tired. Avoid late evenings after a long day at work.
  6. Wear appropriate shoes, high heals and flip flops are out!
  7. If you don’t understand something your instructor says, ask them to explain what they are trying to acheive.
  8. Don’t panic about other road users, or worry about what they think about you, just do your best, besides they’ve got their own stuff to worry about and probably won’t spare a moments thought over you.

 

Above all don’t stop and start lessons, or leave big gaps between them, because this will increase the lessons you’ll need and you could be learning for years.

After each lesson reflect on what you’ve learnt and write the important stuff down so you remember what you’ve learnt.

Before each new lesson read your notes from the previous one, this will avoid the instructor having to cover too much old ground.

Before you drive away make sure everything in the car is set correctly and that you are comfortable.

And finally, make sure you understand the purpose of the lesson, and what you are trying to acheive. Set a goal for improvement at the start and see if you manage to accomplish it at the end. This might be as simple as giving yourself a figure out of ten.

 

#learnermindset

 

 

Craig Flintham passed his driving test with Joe!!

Congratulations to Craig who passed his Driving test in July 2019!

Passing your driving test is an awesome stepping stone in life. It provides freedom and independence, career opportunities, and those insta moments of being able to post a pic of your first car! Driving around with your friends, being able to go places in Summer, or even driving to maccies on a Sunday morning. Once you get a car, you’ll always want to be the designated driver. Plus, lots of careers require you to have a license! All these amazing opportunities have opened up for:

craig flintham!

Craig passed his driving test, with Elite Instructor Joe! Joe really enjoyed teaching Craig and instilling him with safe driving for life!

We want to wish Craig all the best for the future!

Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drivingschoolshull/

Jordan Passed his Test!

Congratulations to Jordan Hampton who passed his Driving test in July 2019!

Passing your driving test is an awesome stepping stone in life. It provides freedom and independence, career opportunities, and those insta moments of being able to post a pic of your first car! Driving around with your friends, being able to go places in Summer, or even driving to maccies on a Sunday morning. Once you get a car, you’ll always want to be the designated driver. Plus, lots of careers require you to have a license! All these amazing opportunities have opened up for:

Jordan Hampton

Jordan passed his driving test, with Elite Instructor Tim! Tim has taught Jordan to be a great driver, and just in time before he leave Hull after graduating from University!

We want to wish Jordan all the best for the future!

Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drivingschoolshull/

Christabel Passed!

Congratulations to Christabel who passed her Driving test in June 2019!

Passing your driving test is an awesome stepping stone in life. It provides freedom and independence, career opportunities, and those insta moments of being able to post a pic of your first car! Driving around with your friends, being able to go places in Summer, or even driving to maccies on a Sunday morning. Once you get a car, you’ll always want to be the designated driver. Plus, lots of careers require you to have a license! All these amazing opportunities have opened up for:

Christabel Fisher

Christabel passed her driving test, with Elite Instructor Tim Richards! Tim has taught Christabel to be a safe and conscientious driver, meaning she is instilled with safe driving for life!

We want to wish Christabel all the best for the future!

Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drivingschoolshull/

Freedom when you pass your driving test

Congratulations to Lewis Rennison who passed his driving test on his FIRST attempt with only 23 hours of tuition! Lewis is a part of the Ron Dearing Bursary Scheme, and was so pleased to have passed his test first time!

 

Lewis now has the freedom to drive, meaning he can drive his friends round, go shopping without having to rely on public transport, and not have to rely on mum and dad anymore! We hope Lewis has a great time driving, and we want to wish him the best of luck for the future!

 

ADI training – my first student on a proper driving lesson

My First student on a proper driving lesson

Well, today I took my First student for a proper driving lesson, no role play, the real thing.

My Student was a young man who had been near test standard 5 or more years ago but hadn’t driven since.

So, my plan was to pick him up and drive him somewhere quite to get him started, after all he’d probably be very rusty & would appreciate starting from a easier location than in a busy area of Hull.

I was apprehensive because it was my first time instructing after more than a 25 break, and I also had the eagle eyed Stu sat in the back to evaluate my performance and offer recommendations.

As it turned out Stu proved he was also useful as my personal assistant, responsible for passing my training workbooks from the back seat when I needed them.

Next time I’ll get him to fetch the starbucks 🙂

After meeting my student and explaining the plan to drive him to location, I asked him about his previous experience on the way, and why he hadn’t taken lessons for over 5 years.

He was nervous, which was evident from his shaking hands, but I reassured him that the lesson would go well, and he would enjoy his time with me.

Having no previous knowledge of his ability, I asked if he had any concerns or worries from past lessons, and suggested we should start with a drive which would help him get used to the car as well as me and Stu.

We both agreed that was a good idea, and before getting underway I asked him if his seat and mirrors were adjusted correctly, and if he could recall where the blind spots were.

We then spoke about the balance of responsibility, and how much input he wanted and needed, and that that responsibility might alter during the lesson.

I also assured him  that I had dual controls, but would only use them as a last resort, and if I did use them, I’d let him know, and we’d pull up and talk about it.

He asked for a dry run through the gear box with the engine off, and I also suggested he take a few attempts at finding biting point with the engine running.

Ok, “ready to move” Yes, “then move away when it’s safe please was my instruction.

I was prepared for him to stall (negative) but he moved the car with very little problem. “well done”, I said “that was nice & smooth” (early praise).

After 8 minutes of driving a fairly basic route we pulled over to the left. This was my chance to workout the lesson plan.

His driving was as expected rusty, but it was his driving position that was my first focus and in need of immediate attention.

He drove way too far to the right, and a mile away from park cars, which left oncoming vehicles needing to move to the left.

He also had a habit of cutting left turns resulting in the rear wheel nearly mounting the kerb on several occasions.

Time for Mr fix it, ta dah.

Right, I said; “How do you feel that went.

“I was a bit scared he said but it wasn’t as bad as I expected”.

“Yeah, I completely understand why you would be scared after 5 years, but you did well, your move away was good, as was your gear changing” I said.

“What do you think about your driving position” I said, “especially during normal driving, and passing parked vehicles”?

“I’m terrible with distance, and scared of hitting parked cars” he said

“Yes, I understand why you would be scared of hitting parked cars, do you feel you move further to the right to compensate” I said.

“I’m not sure how far I am from the left” he said.

So, we agreed the distance required from the left hand side of the carriageway, and an adequate distance from parked cars.

We also made sure we both agreed on a measure, for example I asked him what a meter looked like to him, He demonstrated using his hands with a gap of only half a meter, so that was a big learn for him.

We spoke about the result of being too far right or left and the danger of colliding with other road users, parked cars and even the kerb.

We also spoke about cutting the left corners, and I explained why this happens, and the dangers of getting it wrong .

“So, if we were to go back over that route again, how would you handle it differently?” I said.

He explained what he would do differently, and we agreed on his aims and objectives for the lesson.

After the lesson I reflected on my performance with Stu. We agreed it went pretty well, my student gained in confidence and ability, and I felt I’d done an okay lesson.

Sure, I was in control of the lesson, but I felt my communication skills needed work, and I also knew I needed to involve my student more, giving him an input in the lessons direction and content, and allowing him a more active role in the decision making process.

This was also confirmed by Stu after the lesson.

So, the big take from today’s lesson is communication, it’s a two way thing. I should treat the lesson more as a conversation in which my student and I talk about their goals, and how between us we can acheive them.

Until the next outing

See Ya.

 

 

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ADI training part three 2nd session

ADI training part three, the story so far

 

ADI training part three 2nd session & Wow, 25 years away form the driver training industry and the teaching methods have really changed.

Sitting in the passenger seat instructing feels alien. You wouldn’t believe I’d been an instructor in the past.

The first thing I noticed are all the new road layouts in the city. I don’t normally travel  around these area’s so planning the route has led to a few hiccups.

There were few roundabouts I totally cocked up on directions. The first was at the end of mount pleasant, where you can no longer turn right.

The second was at a roundabout in Hessle. We had just left the A63 at what I call the B&Q roundabout heading towards the flyover in Hessle, the one where Asda is.

I asked Stu to take the first exit, before noticing that a new super market had been plonked to the left. The result could have caused confusion had Stu put a signal on. Fortunately he entered the roundabout passing the exit of the car park first before signalling.

Stu recommended I put some miles into driving around the city and re-learning the roads and new layouts.

But, the big change to teaching is the DVSA’s desire for instructors to be client centered in their training. I gather this is one change many ADI’s themselves are struggling with.

I’ve found there’s a lot of confusion among instructors, and it seems as though the DVSA haven’t been clear about what client centered learning looks like in today’s lessons.

Stu’s got client centered nailed, but he said ADI’s are seeking help to understand what the DVSA want, especially from those ADI’s who have been invited for a standards check.

Any way back to my part three training. My early sessions are the role play method, before we move on and find students for me to teach.

Stu put me in control, and left me to decide which lesson theme we would be practicing, and what level the student’s knowledge and ability would be.

Eager not to start at too high a level, I chose a trained pupil at a reasonable standard, but not yet ready for a test as the character Stu would role play. And the lesson theme I decided to tackle was defensive driving.

Now to be clear, we didn’t treat the role play like the old part 3 role play scenario. Stu portrayed as near as dam it a real learner consistently making mistakes throughout the lesson aimed at throwing me off the lesson theme.

I started the lesson with a recap of the previous lesson covering what was learnt and what we had agreed to work on this lesson.

I asked questions that probed his knowledge and helped him find solutions that would help him fix the mistakes made from the previous lesson.

We agreed on the lesson structure, and who would be responsible for the various roles during the lesson.

“Ok Stu, have you got your seat in the correct position and mirrors adjusted correctly, yes? right then move away when safe please” was my instruction.

Within the first 10 seconds we found ourselves leaving the car park we were in via an exit that had a blind view to the left due to overgrown foliage.

And, a blind bend 50 meters to the right to contend with. I asked Stu, to point out the danger, and how we should deal with it safely.

He said that his main worry was a vehicle coming quickly round the bend while he was creeping out into the junction to get a clear view of the left.

We agreed that it would be the best practice for him to lean forward and quickly check both sides constantly until we were sure there was not danger from the left, then at that point we could briskly emerge to the right before a vehicle could be upon us.

 

A good start I thought, even though we’d only traveled a few hundred feet.

As the lesson progressed, I identified errors Stu was making and relayed them back to him with the dangers that they could cause, and what was needed to avoid these mistakes again.

The more serious problems, and those difficult to talk about on the move, I pulled Stu up on the left for a chat. This was an area which wasn’t great for me because I was telling and not questioning as the DVSA wanted.

Ask questions that probes their knowledge. This approach will help you understand their thinking and then you can help them find a solution that they can focus on to resolve their mistakes, Stu said.

Easier said than done, because the original method of instruction I was taught 30 years previously, is to tell them what they’ve done wrong, explain why it was wrong, and demonstrate the correct way to do it, simples.

Anyway, at the end of the lesson after my debrief, Stu gave me some examples of using client centered techniques during a students debrief, which would help me gain valuable feedback and in turn help both myself and my student understanding where the gaps in their knowledge might be.

My my big learn from today is to ‘listen more talk less (something my partner reminds me to do often), ask better quality questions and understand the needs of my students’.

 

Watch out for my next post, the journey so far.

“Till next time”

See ya.

 

 

Training to become a driving instructor? Follow my Progress.

Training to become a driving instructor, back to the very beginning

 

30 Years ago I qualified as a driving instructor, and spent 5 years teaching people the skill of driving. I loved helping people pass their driving test, it was a absolute buzz.

Training to become a driving instructor was the best thing I could have done at the time, because it got me away from working for others, and gave me the opportunity, and independence to make my own way through life.

Although I loved being a driving instructor, I found something I loved even more, which was business.

And for the last 25  years I owned, managed and been a partner in four businesses, and I continue to be a director of two today.

During those 25 years I’ve not been involved in teaching people to drive, but recently I volunteered to retrain.

I was asked by a good friend, and respected trainer to retrain as a driving instructor, purely to help them re-model their training plan, so I said yes why not.

But, what I didn’t know at the time is he wanted me to start from scratch, and that meant study preparation for the ADI part one theory.

Now, I thought I still had a good knowledge of the information an ADI needed to know, but after 25 years away from the job, it’s amazing just how much one forgets.

Anyway, I decided to go all in and planned to give myself four weeks of study before taking the test.

Now, four weeks is a demanding schedule, because when I trained 30 years ago, I spent 20 weeks preparing for the part one before passing the paper test in Leeds.

Training to become a driving instructor

Armed, with all the usual books that you have to read, I wasted the first two weeks, and didn’t open any.

So, with the fear, not to mention embarrassment of failing the test, I knuckled down and spent a fairly intensive two weeks reading and practicing the online theory software the school had provided.

I managed to squeeze two hours into 6 evenings, and a 5 hour stint on a rainy Sunday. Yes, I know that’s not really intensive, but it was all the spare time I could allocate to study.

I went to bed dreaming about signs, markings, stopping distances, road procedure, and goodness knows what else.

Anyway the big day arrived and I wasn’t filled with confidence, but that said, even if I had given myself 20 weeks, I would have wasted most of that time doing everything other than study, and I would have still felt the same as I did.

A couple of hours later, I left the test center with a reasonably healthy pass. So, the big take from this lesson is don’t wait to get perfect, and definitely avoid given yourself 20 weeks to study, because like most people, you only need 4 weeks of fairly intensive study.

A big thing I learnt, was to stop wasting time sat in front of the telly. I would say many of us can find 3 hours a night to read just by not turning the telly on.

On to part two. Stu took me out on a two hour assessment, and gave me some pointers of what I needed to practice in my own car, before my second two hour session.

Another 2 hours later and I was taking the test. Strange turning up at the test center, and waiting for an examiner and praying that you pass.

Anyway, I passed but I did get one minor for  hesitancy. Me, hesitant never. It’s weird why you do stuff that you wouldn’t do normally.

So, back to the present, and I’m starting preparation for the part three. I went out for my first session yesterday with Stu.

It was good fun, and brought back many good experiences, but, I knew straight away that it wasn’t going to come flooding back to me, and the worlds moved on, the new buzz word is client centered learning.

Basically, my understanding is that instead of telling the client what to do umpteen times and hope it sticks, we now have to find a method that helps them learn from their own experiences.

This involves asking thought provoking questions, and discussing the learners needs.

 

Training to become a driving instructor

Now I know from experience that many people who embark on training to become a driving instructor can find the part three overwhelming.

But, on a positive I think of it this way. If you had a big enough piece of land, a car you didn’t need ha ha, and someone who’s never driven before. You could throw the keys at them and say get on with it.

Now without help, over time most would learn to drive the car. Now put an experienced driver next to them, and they’ll learn much quicker.

Then put a driving instructor with them and they’ll learn even quicker. So, a driving instructors job is to teach a system developed by the DVSA, and manage the risk of the learning environment.

So, most drivers already posses some of the skills necessary to help people learn. But, the major skill is to learn the DVSA teaching syllabus, and the skills of good communication, listening,observing patience and understanding.

So, like  with any new job, you have to learn a system or process, but most importantly you must want to become an expert of what you do, which means setting time aside to research and learn.

And, that is what I’ll be doing this week in preparation for my next lesson with Stu.

I’ll keep you informed of my progress, mistakes I make (which will be many) and my big learns as I go through the final part of the training.

 

 

 

New Drivers Could Face Second Driving Test After Two Years

New Drivers Could Face Second Driving Test After Two Years

This is such a controversial topic. It’s easy to understand why the government would want to implement these rules such as: No driving at Night; Only driving cars with smaller engines; taking another driving test after 2 years. It is a huge operation that they’re proposing. So I am going to break it down so we can make a proper evaluation of the proposed.

I agree with the government. Too many young lives are lost each year, as they cause a quarter of all road accidents. That is a lot. I do feel that some form of implementation needs to take place in order for this to be reduced.

Let’s take each point, one step at a time.

Pleas take the time to read the full article, before reading our ideas and thoughts by clicking here.

 

“Not be able to drink alcohol before driving because of a lowered drink drive limit”.

Now this one seems like a no brainer. Alcohol effects the way we drive, that’s just common knowledge. At age 17, although drinking alcohol is illegal, until the age of 18 in the UK, we know that 17’s drink. They’re also allowed to drink alcohol from the age of 16 in a pub or bar, as long as they’re having a meal, and it is bought by an adult, and they are accompanied by an adult. This is limited to beer, cider and wine.

Additionally, from the age of 5, they are legally allowed to drink alcohol in their own home. a 17 year old has not had the chance to build up the same tolerance to alcohol as someone older. Because it is illegal, they do not go out to pubs and bars to drink, unlike people of age.

Therefore, they get drunk faster, meaning that the even a small amount of alcohol can easily effect them. I think there should be a no drink and drive policy completely in the UK, as with the amount of transport now available, there is no need.

Additionally, I am sure that parents would rather have to come and collect their kids from the club at 3am, knowing they’re safe, rather than letting them dangerously drink drive. They may huff and puff about it, but they’d prefer it.

“Have to take another test at the end of the two-year probation period”.

This is both a good and a bad idea. I’m sure many will have their own thoughts on having to take another driving test. Driving tests are stressful, and expensive.

So what is supposed to happen at the end of the second test, if you fail?

And what if you haven’t driven for that entire 2 year period? This is modelled on the USA, but the difference is, the 16, 17 and 18 year olds can all drive their parents car no problem, because of the different way the insurance works.

Over here, buying a car, insuring it, MOTing it, Servicing it, and taxing it can cost a LOT. Insurance for new drivers somewhere around £2,000; MOT £30.00 but then need to pay for fixing.

Car tax, dependant on car. Car from £2,000 – £10,000. What 17 year old can afford this?! Especially with the new laws that you now have to remain in education until you’re 18 years of age, and must do some form of educational route, such as college, apprenticeships etc.

And the majority of parents can’t afford to pay that for their children, as it it pretty much half the general wage of  a UK resident.

So, what happens, if you haven’t driven in the 2 year period?

Will there be special allowances for that?

It’s common for 17 year olds to do lessons for their 17th birthday, so they get it over and done with.

Therefore, the teen is going to be at least 19, (most probably) away at university, and has to come and do another driving test, after having no practice in 2 years?

I think its a good idea, as it will insure that they are capable to come off the probation period, but I can’t imagine how it will work effectively.

“Not be able to drive after dark or drive cars with larger engines”

Okay, so this is the one that doesn’t make the most sense to me. In America, it has been adopted in some states, that driving between certain hours without supervision is prohibited.

In England, that wouldn’t work. Especially considering that in Winter we have about 6 hours of actual Daylight, so how are they supposed to get to and from college/school/work, without travelling in the dark?

They’re learning and working when its light, and then at 3:00pm, it gets dark.

Most schools tend to kick out between 3 and 4pm. So surely, that couldn’t work? And then that leads to the point, that surely, more accidents happen during the day, during rush hour, when people are running late, rushing and being less cautious, then at night, when there are hardly any cars around?

I get that its dark, making vision more impaired, but that happens at 3:00pm in the UK, so surely, they can’t have a curfew that early?

And if they were allowed to drive until say 8:00pm, the whats the difference driving at that time, than 2:00am with less cars?

It is still the same amount of darkness.

Larger engines is interesting though, because they are extremely powerful, and should be used by more experienced drivers, I think. They handle a lot harder than a smaller car, and they are also a lot more expensive to insure. I don’t think that there should be a problem after the 2 year probation period, but during the 2 year period, I think smaller engines should be used only.

 

What do you think to these proposed new laws? We’d love to hear your idea on them, and if you think they will work. Let us know!

-Elite HQ

The Best Driving Tunes

The Best Driving Tunes

A compiled list of the 50 best driving songs, to get you through the cold weather (well, in our opinion!)

We love driving, but in Winter, it can be treacherous, which is why we believe, the right playlist can turn that frown, upside down! Here are a list of songs, that we think can get you through the rubbish weather!

(Please note that these are not in order, we probably love them all equally)

  • Don’t stop Believing – Journey
  • Somebody to Love – Queen
  • Make you Feel My Love – Adele (for those rainy days, where you want to look out the window and pretend you’re in a super sad music video)
  • Bitter Sweet Symphony – The Verve
  • There She Goes – The La’s
  • Stacey’s Mom – Fountains of Wayne
  • Bring Me To Life – Evanescence
  • This is Me – Keala Settle, The Greatest Showman Soundtrack
  • Video Games – Lana Del Rey
  • Everlong – Foo Fighters
  • Iris – The Goo Goo Dolls
  • You and Me Song – The Wannadies
  • Alive – Sia
  • Somewhere Only We Know – Keane
  • Wherever You Will Go – The Calling
  • Secrets – One Republic
  • Move Along – The All American Rejects
  • Drunk In Love – Beyonce
  • Little Lion Man – Mumford and Sons
  • Feeling Good – Michael Buble
  • I Wanna Dance with Somebody – Whitney Houston
  • I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor – Arctic Monkeys
  • Yellow – Coldplay
  • Walking on Sunshine – Katrina and the Waves
  • What I Like About You – the Romantics
  • Twist and Shout – the Beatles
  • Summer of ’69 – Bryan Adams
  • Hey Soul Sister – Train
  • Sweet Child O’ Mine – Guns N Roses
  • Before He Cheats – Carrie Underwood
  • Runnin’ (Lose it All) – Naughty Boy, Beyonce
  • Jolene – Dolly Parton
  • Piano Man – Billy Joel
  • Human – Rag’n’Bone Man
  • Secret Love Song – Little Mix
  • Power – Little Mix
  • Radioactive – Imagine Dragons
  • Mr Brightside – The Killers
  • I’ll be There for You – The Rembrandts
  • Gold Digger – Kanye West, Jamie Foxx
  • Shine – Take That
  • Need You Now – Lady Antebellum
  • Sex On Fire – Kings of Leon
  • Highway to Hell – AC/DC
  • Jessie’s Girl – Rick Springfield
  • I’m a Believer – The Monkees
  • Wild Ones – Flo Rida ft. Sia
  • With or Without You – U2
  • Numb – Linkin Park
  • Half the World Away – Oasis

So what do you think? We think that this makes a killer playlist for Road Tripping!

What songs would you like to see on here?

Let us know in the comments, or on Facebook!

-Elite HQ