Driving Test Changes You Need to Know About

If you didn’t know already, the UK driving test is changing from the 4th December 2017 (not a very nice Christmas present, is it?). We are updating you with the most recent changes made by the DVSA.

It was released on the 13th September 2017, that there would be revised changes to the ‘Show me’ ‘Tell me’ portion of the test.

If you don’t know what this is, it is where the examiner will ask you a ‘show me’ question and a ‘tell me’ question at the beginning of your driving test. These questions are given to you by your instructor to prepare you for your test.

The ‘Tell me’ Questions are as follows:

1. Tell me how you’d check that the brakes are working before starting a journey.

Brakes should not feel spongy or slack. Brakes should be tested as you set off. Vehicle should not pull to one side.

Manufacturer’s guide, use a reliable pressure gauge, check and adjust pressures when tyres are cold, don’t forget spare tyre, remember to refit valve caps.

3. Tell me how you make sure your head restraint is correctly adjusted so it provides the best protection in the event of a crash.

The head restraint should be adjusted so the rigid part of the head restraint is at least as high as the eye or top of the ears, and as close to the back of the head as is comfortable. Note: Some restraints might not be adjustable.

4. Tell me how you’d check the tyres to ensure that they have sufficient tread depth and that their general condition is safe to use on the road.

No cuts and bulges, 1.6mm of tread depth across the central three-quarters of the breadth of the tyre, and around the entire outer circumference of the tyre.

5. Tell me how you’d check that the headlights and tail lights are working. You don’t need to exit the vehicle.

Explain you’d operate the switch (turn on ignition if necessary), then walk round vehicle (as this is a ‘tell me’ question, you don’t need to physically check the lights).

6. Tell me how you’d know if there was a problem with your anti-lock braking system.

Warning light should illuminate if there is a fault with the anti-lock braking system.

7. Tell me how you’d check the direction indicators are working. You don’t need to exit the vehicle.

Explain you’d operate the switch (turn on ignition if necessary), and then walk round vehicle (as this is a ‘tell me’ question, you don’t need to physically check the lights).

8. Tell me how you’d check the brake lights are working on this car.

Explain you’d operate the brake pedal, make use of reflections in windows or doors, or ask someone to help.

9. Tell me how you’d check the power-assisted steering is working before starting a journey.

If the steering becomes heavy, the system may not be working properly. Before starting a journey, 2 simple checks can be made.

Gentle pressure on the steering wheel, maintained while the engine is started, should result in a slight but noticeable movement as the system begins to operate. Alternatively turning the steering wheel just after moving off will give an immediate indication that the power assistance is functioning.

10. Tell me how you’d switch on the rear fog light(s) and explain when you’d use it/them. You don’t need to exit the vehicle.

Operate switch (turn on dipped headlights and ignition if necessary). Check warning light is on. Explain use.

11. Tell me how you switch your headlight from dipped to main beam and explain how you’d know the main beam is on.

Operate switch (with ignition or engine on if necessary), check with main beam warning light.

12. Open the bonnet and tell me how you’d check that the engine has sufficient oil.

Identify dipstick/oil level indicator, describe check of oil level against the minimum and maximum markers.

13. Open the bonnet and tell me how you’d check that the engine has sufficient engine coolant.

Identify high and low level markings on header tank where fitted or radiator filler cap, and describe how to top up to correct level.

14. Open the bonnet and tell me how you’d check that you have a safe level of hydraulic brake fluid.

Identify reservoir, check level against high and low markings.

 

And the ‘Show me’ questions:

  1. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you wash and clean the rear windscreen?
  2. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you wash and clean the front windscreen?
  3. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d switch on your dipped headlights?
  4. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d set the rear demister?
  5. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d operate the horn?
  6. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d demist the front windscreen?
  7. When it’s safe to do so, can you show me how you’d open and close the side window?

 

Now with the changes to the Driving Test, it means that the ‘tell me’ questions will be asked at the beginning of the test, and the ‘show me’ questions will now be asked during the driving test, whilst under their examination.

However, do not fret, the changes are not made until the 4th December, so you have plenty of time to figure how to undertake these ‘show me’s’ in your instructors car.

We hope this helps and we will keep you updated with any more changes to the UK Driving Test on the Elite Blog, so make sure to follow Elite on Social Media, so you can be updated with any Driving Test changes coming your way by December!

The Elite Team

Before you start driving

Prior to taking the next step and beginning your driving lessons.

The minimum age in the UK to start driving lessons is 17. However, those that want to start driving should be in possession of a UK provisional license issued by the DVLA (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency).

Provisional license

The initial step is to acquire a provisional license. If a person wanted to begin their driving lessons as soon as they turned 17, it is possible to apply for a provisional license three months before that person’s 17th birthday. It will arrive before their birthday but will not be valid until that day.

If a person is entitled to mobility allowance, they can apply for their provisional license at the age of 16.

Reading

Another step to consider would be to take up some essential reading either during your driving lessons or before you begin them. The Highway Code is recommended, along with preparing for your hazard perception and driving theory to ensure you are well equipped with the right knowledge for your tests. There’s a variety of resources available on the internet.

Please visit the website if you would like to begin your driving lessons in the Hull area!

 

Passing your driving test quicker

Learning to drive is an exciting time for anyone.

It’s natural for those that are eager to begin driving to want to pass as soon as possible and get out there.

Below, we’ve listed some steps that have the potential to cut down the overall length of your working process.

Provisional

Apply for your provisional licence early as it will take roughly three weeks for it to be processed by the DVLA and then extra time for your licence to be delivered. Some may opt to apply for their provisional two months prior to turning 17.

If you send off your application early, you will be able to begin your driving lessons soon after your birthday.

Learn your theory

Along with applying early for your provisional licence, you may want to learn the highway code which will help with your Theory Test. You will then have a full understanding of procedures on the road, the signs and the markings you will come across when you are learning to drive.

Bump up your hourly lessons

Driving lessons are often split into one-hour sessions, however, it is considered to be advantageous to designate up to two hours of driving training per lesson. If you do manage to extend your hours to a couple of two-hour sessions could potentially reduce the overall learning time scale.

A disadvantage of only having a one-hour lesson is there not being enough time to fully learn a subject and practice it, whereas two-hour lessons will give you that extra time.

Keep practicing

By having your car that is used for learning insured, you will be able to practice the routines and subjects learned in your driving lessons. This will be useful to avoid repetitive sessions. There are manoeuvres that will need to be practiced often to perfect, where your insured car will come in handy.

Keep in mind that you must always be accompanied by a full licence holder that is over the age of 21 and has 3+ experience in driving and display learner plates at the front and rear of the vehicle.

Practical test

The time will come when your instructor believes you are almost there regarding taking your test. It is advisable to consult your local test centre seeking out the current waiting times for booking a practical test. It’s possible that you could be waiting weeks, even months thus meaning this extra time will lengthen how long it takes for you to pass your test. Discuss a suitable booking time with your instructor which can allow for a wise use of the waiting period between then and the day of your driving test to finish your training.

If you’d like to book your driving lessons in York, please visit our website!